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Ken Gallacher - Slim Jim Baxter (2nd Hand Hardback)

£14.95
SKU B001798
Synopsis

Jim Baxter was one of the greatest footballers Scotland has ever produced. But his career was over by the time he reached 30 and in 2001 he died at the early age of 61, the victim of a lifestyle that ultimately destroyed him.

Slim Jim Baxter charts the great man's rollercoaster years, his emergence at Ibrox as a world-class midfield player and the rapid decline as he pressed the self-destruct button and blew away his life as a footballer.

Team-mates and friends tell how Baxter lived by his own rules and how he finally faced up to death with a courage and dignity which impressed all who saw him in his last few tragic months.

Above all, Ken Gallacher's biography is the story of an extraordinary footballer who was touched by genius, and of a young man from the Fife coal-fields who could not always cope with the fame his skills brought him.

Details
  • Format : Standard 2nd Hand Hardback with Dust Jacket
  • Condition : Very Good
  • Category : Non-Fiction - Sports & Pastimes
  • Published : 2002 (Virgin Books - 1st Edition)
  • ISBN : 9781852279622
  • SKU : B001798
  • PPC : SP550gm
  • RRP : £18.99 (Unclipped)
  • Quantity Available : 1 only.

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External Reviews

"This was a very well researched book which was an excellent read. Insights from players who new Baxter and played with him for his club and country gave a new slant on this flawed football genius." - Google Review.

The Author

Born in Monifieth, and educated at Harris Academy, he had been a teenage ball-boy at Dens Park, Dundee, in the 1950's golden age of inside forward Billy Steel. He started in journalism on the Dundee Courier in 1956, but soon graduated to Daily Record in Glasgow, which he joined as a sports reporter, becoming chief football writer in 1972. He covered nine World Cup competitions, and such was the friendship and trust that he generated in Scottish football - from Jock Stein through to Sir Alex Ferguson - that scoops were consistent.