Skip to content

Kenneth Sisam (Ed.) - Chaucer - The Clerk's Tale (2nd Hand Hardback)

£3.45
SKU B002371
Synopsis

Full title : The Clerkes Tale of Oxenford (1387).

Edited by Kenneth Sisam.

Literary criticism and description with Chaucer's full text.

The Clerk's Tale is the first tale of Group E (Fragment IV) in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. It is preceded by The Summoner's Tale and followed by The Merchant's Tale.

The Clerk of Oxenford (Oxford) is a student of what would nowadays be considered philosophy or theology. He tells the tale of Griselda, a young woman whose husband tests her loyalty in a series of cruel torments that recall the Biblical book of Job.

One of the characters created by Chaucer is the Oxford clerk, who is a student of philosophy. He is depicted as thin and impoverished, hard-working and wholly dedicated to his studies.

The narrator claims that as a student in Italy he met Francis Petrarch at Padua from whom he heard the tale.

Details
  • Format : Small 2nd Hand Hardback (No Dust Jacket Issued)
  • Condition : Very Good
  • Category : Fiction - Poetry & Plays
  • Published : 1923 (This Edition 1966 - Oxford at the Clarendon Press )
  • ISBN : N/A
  • SKU : B002371
  • PPC : LL200gm
  • RRP : N/A
  • Quantity Available : 1 only.

Good condition barely read. brown boards with decoration. inked out name & address on inside cover. Glossy pages, very well illustrated.

External Reviews

"Chaucer uses the Clerk's prologue to explain the techniques to be used in narrating a good story: no abstruse boring meditations, no moralizing about sins, no high rhetorical flourishes, but plain and direct speaking. The Host's warning against too lofty and pedantic style is not necessary because the Clerk tells his story in an "honest method, as wholesome as sweet." - CliffsNotes.com

The Editor & The Author

Kenneth Sisam FBA was a New Zealand academic and publisher, whose major career was as an employee of the Oxford University Press.

Geoffrey Chaucer was an English poet and author. Widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages, he is best known for The Canterbury Tales. He has been called the "father of English literature", or, alternatively, the "father of English poetry".