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Neil Gaiman - Anansi Boys (2nd Hand Hardback)

£9.95
SKU B002270
Synopsis

Fat Charlie Nancy is not actually fat. He was fat once but he is definitely not fat now.

No, right now Fat Charlie Nancy is angry, confused and more than a little scared - right now his life is spinning out of control, and it is all his dad's fault.

If his rotter of an estranged father hadn't dropped dead at a karaoke night, Charlie would still be blissfully unaware that his dad was Anansi the spider god. He would have no idea that he has a brother called Spider, who is also a god. And there would be no chance that said brother would be trying to take over his life, flat and fiancée, or, to make matters worse, be doing a much better job of it than him.

Desperate to reclaim his life, Charlie enlists the help of four more-than-slightly eccentric old ladies and their unique brand of voodoo - and between them they unleash a bitter and twisted force to get rid of Spider.

But as darkness descends and badness begins is Fat Charlie Nancy going to get his life back in one piece or is he about to enter a whole netherworld of pain?

Details
  • Format : Thick 2nd Hand Hardback with Dust Jacket
  • Condition : Good (Almost Very Good)
  • Category : Fiction - Fantasy
  • Published : 2005 (Headline Review - 1st Edition, 1st Printing with exclusive extra material)
  • ISBN : 
  • SKU : B002270
  • SSP : SP600gm
  • RRP : £17.99 (Unclipped)
  • Quantity Available : 1 only.

Includes extra material exclusive to Headline Review's edition.

External Reviews

'Bizarre, bonkers . . . rather brilliant' - Ian Hislop.

'A warm, funny, immensely entertaining story about the impossibility of putting up with your relations - especially if they happen to be Gods. Anansi Boys combines the anarchy of Douglas Adams with a Wodehousian generosity of spirit. Guaranteed to make all but the most committed arachnophobe feel gratefully towards spiders' - Susanna Clarke.

'Mixing farce and fantasy, epic mythology and domestic drama, Gaiman's novel is a clever piece of storytelling and a celebration of the magic of make-believe.'-
 Independent on Sunday.